Mariner Athletes give back to the community

May 11th, 2014

VIU Athletes Give Back To Community

Vancouver Island University (VIU) athletes gave back to the community today by assisting at an event that combines spelling and sports at Ladysmith Secondary School.

Up to 120 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students from Nanaimo-Ladysmith and the Cowichan Valley school districts tested their knowledge in the 11th annual Spuptitul language competition, the first to be hosted in the Nanaimo-Ladysmith district.

Hul'qumi'num is the language spoken by at least three First Nation bands from Nanoose to Mill Bay, including the Snuneymuxw. The goal was to provide a fun environment where students can test their knowledge and proficiency in the use and applications of the Hul’qumi’num language.

As part of the day’s programming, there was a series of short basketball, soccer and lacrosse workshops with VIU and Naniamo Timbermen athletes. Each workshop had Hul'qumi'num speakers present to teach Hul’qumi’num phrases and selected words often used by players of each sport.

“We are excited about this experiential opportunity to teach students the language while they participate in the sports they love,” said Nanaimo-Ladysmith school trustee Bill Robinson, who enlisted the help of the VIU soccer and basketball athletes.

"This is a great way to give back to the community because through sports we can all find a common language,” says VIU student Dan Cato, a former Mariner soccer player, who participated with two other Mariner soccer players.

“When we associate sports with their home culture, and language it encourages them to use it in everyday life, and helps restore this culture into the lives of people in our community. Using these words on the field and the gym will encourage youth to stay connected to their home language."

Robinson says the annual Spuptitul competition allows Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students to learn more about each other, and First Nations culture and language. The Hul'qumi'num language is being revived slowly as more children learn to speak it.

The event was organized by the Nanaimo-Ladysmith school district's multicultural and race relations committee. It was opened by chiefs from the three First Nations in the school district, including Chief John Elliott from the Stz'uminus First Nation, the Snuneymuxw's Chief John Wesley and Chief David Bob from the Snaw'naw'as First Nation.

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Marilyn Assaf, Communications Officer, Vancouver Island University

VIU Athletes Give Back To Community

Vancouver Island University (VIU) athletes gave back to the community today by assisting at an event that combines spelling and sports at Ladysmith Secondary School.

Up to 120 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students from Nanaimo-Ladysmith and the Cowichan Valley school districts tested their knowledge in the 11th annual Spuptitul language competition, the first to be hosted in the Nanaimo-Ladysmith district.

Hul'qumi'num is the language spoken by at least three First Nation bands from Nanoose to Mill Bay, including the Snuneymuxw. The goal was to provide a fun environment where students can test their knowledge and proficiency in the use and applications of the Hul’qumi’num language.

As part of the day’s programming, there was a series of short basketball, soccer and lacrosse workshops with VIU and Naniamo Timbermen athletes. Each workshop had Hul'qumi'num speakers present to teach Hul’qumi’num phrases and selected words often used by players of each sport.

“We are excited about this experiential opportunity to teach students the language while they participate in the sports they love,” said Nanaimo-Ladysmith school trustee Bill Robinson, who enlisted the help of the VIU soccer and basketball athletes.

"This is a great way to give back to the community because through sports we can all find a common language,” says VIU student Dan Cato, a former Mariner soccer player, who participated with two other Mariner soccer players.

“When we associate sports with their home culture, and language it encourages them to use it in everyday life, and helps restore this culture into the lives of people in our community. Using these words on the field and the gym will encourage youth to stay connected to their home language."

Robinson says the annual Spuptitul competition allows Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students to learn more about each other, and First Nations culture and language. The Hul'qumi'num language is being revived slowly as more children learn to speak it.

The event was organized by the Nanaimo-Ladysmith school district's multicultural and race relations committee. It was opened by chiefs from the three First Nations in the school district, including Chief John Elliott from the Stz'uminus First Nation, the Snuneymuxw's Chief John Wesley and Chief David Bob from the Snaw'naw'as First Nation.

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Marilyn Assaf, Communications Officer, Vancouver Island University P: 250.740.6559 C: 250.618.4596 E: Marilyn.Assaf@viu.ca T: @VIUNews MEDIA CONTACT

- See more at: http://www2.viu.ca/news/page.asp?ID=2632#sthash.3GrukXT6.dpuf

VIU Athletes Give Back To Community

Vancouver Island University (VIU) athletes gave back to the community today by assisting at an event that combines spelling and sports at Ladysmith Secondary School.

Up to 120 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students from Nanaimo-Ladysmith and the Cowichan Valley school districts tested their knowledge in the 11th annual Spuptitul language competition, the first to be hosted in the Nanaimo-Ladysmith district.

Hul'qumi'num is the language spoken by at least three First Nation bands from Nanoose to Mill Bay, including the Snuneymuxw. The goal was to provide a fun environment where students can test their knowledge and proficiency in the use and applications of the Hul’qumi’num language.

As part of the day’s programming, there was a series of short basketball, soccer and lacrosse workshops with VIU and Naniamo Timbermen athletes. Each workshop had Hul'qumi'num speakers present to teach Hul’qumi’num phrases and selected words often used by players of each sport.

“We are excited about this experiential opportunity to teach students the language while they participate in the sports they love,” said Nanaimo-Ladysmith school trustee Bill Robinson, who enlisted the help of the VIU soccer and basketball athletes.

"This is a great way to give back to the community because through sports we can all find a common language,” says VIU student Dan Cato, a former Mariner soccer player, who participated with two other Mariner soccer players.

“When we associate sports with their home culture, and language it encourages them to use it in everyday life, and helps restore this culture into the lives of people in our community. Using these words on the field and the gym will encourage youth to stay connected to their home language."

Robinson says the annual Spuptitul competition allows Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students to learn more about each other, and First Nations culture and language. The Hul'qumi'num language is being revived slowly as more children learn to speak it.

The event was organized by the Nanaimo-Ladysmith school district's multicultural and race relations committee. It was opened by chiefs from the three First Nations in the school district, including Chief John Elliott from the Stz'uminus First Nation, the Snuneymuxw's Chief John Wesley and Chief David Bob from the Snaw'naw'as First Nation.

-30-

Marilyn Assaf, Communications Officer, Vancouver Island University P: 250.740.6559 C: 250.618.4596 E: Marilyn.Assaf@viu.ca T: @VIUNews MEDIA CONTACT

- See more at: http://www2.viu.ca/news/page.asp?ID=2632#sthash.3GrukXT6.dpuf